Nearly 1 in 7 airline pilots suffers from depression, finds study

Nearly 1 in 7 airline pilots suffers from depression, finds study

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Harvard Chan School) have, through an anonymous web-based survey, examined mental health issues affecting commercial airline pilots. The findings, published in the journal Environmental Health in December 2016, show that nearly one in seven pilots suffers from depression. Researchers were prompted to reassess mental health issues among pilots following the premeditated crash of a Germanwings flight in the French Alps which killed 150 people in March 2015. The ill-fated aircraft’s co-pilot suffered from clinical depression and undetected suicide attempts and kept it hidden from his employer. Read more

Brain connectivity can help identify mental disorders in young people, finds study

Brain connectivity can help identify mental disorders in young people, finds study

Every year, millions of Americans suffer from mental illnesses such as depression, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (BD), which render them incapable of doing everyday activities. Even children are not immune to the prevailing crisis of mental health problems. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nearly half of all mental issues start appearing in children before they attain 14 years of age. Read more

Brain cells of schizophrenia patients breakdown in a haphazard manner, finds study

Brain cells of schizophrenia patients breakdown in a haphazard manner, finds study

Schizophrenia is one of the most devastating mental health disorders that affects 1 percent of the world’s population. A unique trait of schizophrenia that distinguishes it from other mental health disorders is the chaos and confusion in mental processing, arising from extremely fast processing of the brain. As a result, the patient loses the ability to think and speak comprehensively. Instead, there is a jumble of random thoughts and incoherent words that make little sense to anybody, except the patient himself or herself. Read more